de Paulo, Craig J.N. Books

Craig J. N. de Paulo is Rector and Professor of Philosophy and Theology at the Collegium Augustinianum in Philadelphia. He has also held professorial appointments at the Pontificia Università Gregoriana in Rome, Fordham University, Boston College and Temple University. A prominent historian of philosophy and a scholar of Augustine of Hippo, he has published many articles and books most recently, Augustinian Just War Theory and the Wars in Afghanistan and Iraq: Confessions, Contentions and the Lust for Power and Confessions of Love: The Ambiguities of Greek Eros and Latin Caritas.

Index to the Three Works by Ioannes Lydus (De Mensibus, De Ostentis, De Magistratibus)
2012 0-7734-4528-5
This edition is textual and translational in nature. Since the works of Lydus are replete with Latin vocabulary, this book serves to bring it into English. The translation is faithful to the original and accurate so as to express Lydus’ intended thoughts. His repetitious use of certain linguistic expressions, although sometimes awkward to render to English, have been retained in order to capture his peculiar linguistic style.

Influence of Augustine on Heidegger
2006 0-7734-5689-9
This book on Augustine and Heidegger represents the single most important contribution to the study surrounding the historical and philosophical influence of St. Augustine of Hippo on Martin Heidegger’s early thought and on his magnus opus, Being and Time. This work sets the record straight about the profound influence of Augustine on Heidegger’s work, Being and Time, which promises a renaissance in phenomenology, the emergence of a new field within this discipline, and the restoration of religion to phenomenological speculation.

On Celestial Signs (De Ostentis)
2012 0-7734-4524-2


On Powers, or the Magistracies of the Roman State (De Magistratibus Republicae Romanae)
2012 0-7734-4526-9


On the Months (De Mensibus). Three Works of Ioannes Lydus
2012 0-7734-4522-6
The objective of this edition is textual and translational in nature. Since the works of Lydus are replete with Latin vocabulary, this book serves to bring it into English. The translation is faithful to the original and accurate so as to express Lydus’ intended thoughts. His repetitious use of certain linguistic expressions, although sometimes awkward to render to English, have been retained in order to capture his peculiar linguistic and seemingly crabbed style. The book tries to put his words into working English for the first time, and the translators were meticulous in trying to do a tight word for word translation based on the text, free from interpretation.