Maréchal, Chantal A. Books

About the author: Chantal A. Maréchal grew up in France, like the poetess she has been celebrating for so many years, in conference papers, articles, and a book In Quest of Marie de France (1992). Founding President of the International Marie de France Society (1992-2001), editor of Le Cygne, the Society’s publication (1994-2001), she is currently the Society’s Webmaster. She has degrees from several universities, including a Maîtrise from the Sorbonne, a M.A. from SUNY-Albany, and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. She is currently an Associate Professor at Virginia Commonwealth University.

In Quest of Marie De France, a Twelfth-Century Poet
1992 0-7734-9586-X
These essays treat a wide variety of aspects of Marie's production; the poet's voice, the moods of her original audience, the beauty and significance of the works' intellectual or emotional appeal, their sexual and textual politics.

Reception and Transmission of the Works of Marie De France, 1774-1974
2003 0-7734-6599-5
For decades, the works of Marie de France have occupied an ever-larger place in the curriculum of French, English, and Women Studies, and have even inspired several poets, novelists and musicians. The monograph is the collaborative endeavor of leading experts in the field. It opens with a preface by Douglas Kelly and an introduction by Chantal A. Maréchal, a tribute to Emanuel J. Mickel Jr., whose 1974 book on Marie de France is presented as a pivotal point in the development of the scholarship. Such a beginning sets the tone for the entire volume. Each chapter is dedicated to a scholar whose writings markedly contributed to the development of Marie de France studies. Thus, by exploring various approaches to reading, editing, and translating, and examining the manner in which these influential interpretations were shaped by the personal experiences of renowned scholars and the concerns of their times, this collection brings depth to the wide range of discussions of Marie’s identity and artistry, and to the very nature of medievalism.