Hermansson, Casie

Dr. Casie Hermansson earned her Ph.D. at the University of Toronto. Dr. Hermansson is currently a Professor of English at Pittsburg State University in Kansas and teaches in the English and Modern Languages Department, where she co-directs the Film and Media Studies Minor.

Reading Feminist Intertextuality Through Bluebeard Stories
2001 0-7734-7394-7
This study offers a new theory for feminist intertextuality based on strategies at work in rewritings of the Bluebeard fairy tale. The book asserts that feminist intertextuality revises one coercive intertext in particular: that of intertextuality theory itself. Rewritings of the fairy tale accordingly can be seen to privilege either the embedded narrative or the escape from it, subscribing either to monologic or dialogic intertextuality. The work examines the original Bluebeard tale group (Perrault, Grimm, variants); historical and modern Bluebeards; and then other writers, including Jane Austen, William Godwin, Margaret Atwood, John Fowles, Peter Ackroyd, Kurt Vonnegut, Angela Carter, Gloria Naylor, Emma Cave, Max Frisch, Stephen King, Méira Cook, and Donald Barthelme.

Study of Film Adaptations of James Barrie’s Storypeter Pan
2016 1-4955-0473-5
Since its earliest incarnation in the writing of James Barrie, the story of Peter Pan has been continuously adapted. Barrie himself adapted the story numerous times, across a plethora of different media. He was also the first to draft a film Scenario of it. However, Barrie's Scenario was not used for the first film adaptation of Peter Pan in 1924. This study argues that Peter's unique qualities serve as both the engine of adaptation and the source of each adaptation's provisional nature. The analysis moves from historical texts to include Barrie's film Scenario and then major twentieth and twenty-first century screen adaptations of Peter Pan.