Reiter, C. Leslie

C. Leslie Reiter is an unaffiliated scholar with a lifelong interest in the Bible. He has concentrated his studies on the life and teachings of Jesus, with a strong background in the Hebrew Scriptures and Biblical languages. Mr. Reiter received his undergraduate education at Eastern Pilgrim College and received his ThB cum laude. Upon receiving a BD from the Iliff School of Theology, he was ordained a minister in the Methodist Church and entered the Navy chaplaincy. Upon release from active duty, he matriculated into the PhD program at Graduate School of Religion, Vanderbilt University, majoring in NT, with a minor in Biblical languages. Completing his course work and passing his comprehensive exams, he assumed his studies as an independent scholar.

Writing in Greek But Thinking in Aramaic. A Study of Vestigial Verbal Communication in the Gospels
2012 0-7734-4062-3
In this monograph the author investigates the syntactic construction found in the Semitic languages known as verbal coordination as it relates to the translation and therefore the interpretation of the scriptures. In the course of his analysis, the author also discusses grammaticalization that has occurred to translate the function of the word from Hebrew to Greek. According to the author, translations of this construction account for certain awkward expressions in the Greek Gospel texts, particularly Mark and John, because the writers were thinking in Semitic and writing in Greek. There are significant implications for Bible scholars, translators and linguists.