Hurley, C. Harold

About the author: C. Harold Hurley is a professor English at Roberts Wesleyan College in Rochester, NY. The author of numerous publications, Dr. Hurley is best known for his work on Milton and Hemingway. His first book, Hemingway’s Debt to Baseball in The Old Man and the Sea: A Collection of Critical Readings, was published by Mellen in 1992. He received his PhD in English from The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio.

Hemingway's Debt to Baseball in The Old Man and The Sea
1992 0-7734-9546-0
Ernest Hemingway's lifelong fascination with baseball finds its ultimate expression in The Old Man and the Sea. This work brings together many of the commentaries that contributed individually and collectively to our understanding of baseball's role in the fiction. They exhibit the extent of Hemingway's familiarity with the sport and its participants; provide needed historical annotation on players and managers; explore the complexities of Santiago's relationship to Joe DiMaggio; identify for the first time the actual games and events underlying the fictional account; and enable interested readers to determine for themselves the aptness of baseball to Hemingway's theme of courage and determination. The writers whose work appears here agree that Hemingway, acclaimed as both athlete and artist, frequently sought to transform the evanescence of sport into the permanence of art.

Milton’s on the Morning of Christ’s Nativity and the Tradition of English Poetry on This Theme
2008 0-7734-5141-2
This anthology of verse contains over sixty poems related to the birth of Christ by more than thirty poets from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in England. The tome offers a unique range of work by luminaries, including John Donne and Ben Jonson, to lesser known figures such as William Alabaster and George Wither.

Sources and Traditions of Milton’s “L’allegro” and “Il Pensoroso”
1999 0-7734-7913-9
This study not only enables a modern audience to assess more fully the nature of Milton’s creativity but also to experience more clearly the companion poems as Milton’s contemporary readers – unencumbered by several centuries of scholarly commentary and accretion – might have experienced them.