Tucker, Bernard Books

About the author: Bernard Tucker is Principal Lecturer and Head of English Department at the LSU College of Higher Education, Southampton (UK). His publications include Teaching English in the Middle Years (Ward Lock Educational, 1973), Jonathan Swift (Gill & Macmillan, 1983), and The Poetry of Mary Barber (Mellen, 1992). His entries on Mary Barber, Laetitia Pilkington, and Constantia Grierson will be included in The Oxford Companion to Irish Literature.

Poetry of Laetitia Pilkington (1712-1750) and Constantia Grierson (1706-1733)
1996 0-7734-8866-9
This volume brings together all the poems by the two women which are available in several eighteenth-century anthologies. This edition prints the poems in their original format as transcribed from the editions in the Bodleian Library. Notes have been added to explain references contemporary and classical, and a brief introduction sets the poets in their background. Because Laetitia Pilkington published her poems randomly interspersed in her Memoirs, this edition reproduces where available for each poem her comments from the Memoirs which often set the poem in context. A companion volume to The Poetry of Mary Barber (Mellen, 1992), this means that virtually all of the poems attributed to these three women are now accessible to scholars and students.

Poetry of Mary Barber (?1690-1757)
1992 0-7734-9465-0
The poems of Mary Barber have been transcribed from the 1734 edition of Poems on Several Occasions in the Bodleian Library. This is the quarto edition published by Samuel Richardson who was also a subscriber. The original spelling, punctuation and capitalization have been retained and, as far as possible, the emphases of the original. These poems enlarge for the 20th-century reader not only the body of 18th-century poetry, but also help balance the often frivolous and cynical view presented by the male poets of the period. In addition, for those interested in the complex personality of Jonathon Swift, Mary Barber and her poems throw new light on the Dean's supposed misogyny.