Hudson, Arthur J.

Arthur J. Hudson, MD, FRCPC, is a neurologist and Professor Emeritus with the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Western Ontario. For several years, he was Research Director at the University Hospital and also served on the program Committee of the Society of Neuroscience in the USA. He has authored over 110 peer-reviewed scientific publications and chapters in various medical and scientific texts. Dr. Hudson is the founder of the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Society of Canada.

Evolution of the Eye From Algae and Jellyfish to Humans: How Vision Adapts to Environment
2010 0-7734-3699-2
This book offers a contextual analysis of the deviations and similarities in cross species eye structures. It questions the role of evolutionary processes such as random mutations, and genetic control mechanisms.

Physiological Basis and Quantum Versions of Memory and Consciousness
2006 0-7734-5746-1
This book on memory and consciousness arose out of a concern for there being a lack of understanding of the physiological processes which underlie consciousness. Knowledge related to the origin of consciousness is essential to many disciplines with an interest in human behavior but because brain damage often produces impaired consciousness it is especially important to neurologists, neurosurgeons and psychologists in managing patients. There have been major advances in how memory is stored and recalled in the cerebral cortex but how memory is very rapidly and transiently accessed during consciousness, as when the environment is swiftly visually scanned and recognized, is not understood. Therefore, a detailed physiological explanation of how memory is integrated with consciousness is necessary if consciousness is to be understood. The reader of this work is provided with a basic overview on the structure and function of neurons, their electrical behavior, the role of neurotransmitters, neural circuits, protein networks, etc. in the recording of information in the cerebral cortex. On this background of knowledge, an electrophysiological theory and quantum versions of consciousness are presented, demonstrating how sensory input can be very rapidly matched to memory and sustain a coherent state of consciousness.